Books in Print

For information about ordering books published by the UGA Press see http://www.ugapress.org/. UGA faculty, staff, and alumni are eligible for a 30% discount if they order by calling (800) 266-5842.

In My Place

In My Place (Farrar Straus Giroux, 1992) is Charlayne Hunter-Gault’s memoir of growing up in South Carolina and Georgia and of her days at the University of Georgia. The final chapter is the text of the Commencement address she delivered at UGA in 1988, 25 years after her own graduation.

To the Mountaintop: My Journey Through the Civil Rights Movement

To the Mountaintop: My Journey Through the Civil Rights Movement (Flash Point, 2012), Charlayne Hunter-Gault's newest book, provides a personal history of the civil rights movement.

An Education in Georgia

An Education in Georgia (University of Georgia Press, 1991) is an account of the desegregation of the university written by journalist Calvin Trillin, who covered the court fight and subsequent events for Time magazine in the early ’60s. An Education in Georgia originally appeared as a series of articles in The New Yorker.

Horace T. Ward: Desegregation of the University of Georgia, Civil Rights Advocacy and Jurisprudence

Horace T. Ward: Desegregation of the University of Georgia, Civil Rights Advocacy and Jurisprudence (Howard University Press, published in 2001, reissued in 2004) by Maurice Daniels recounts Ward’s protracted lawsuit for admission to UGA and his subsequent career as a civil rights litigator, state senator and judge. Ordering info

We Shall Not be Moved

We Shall Not be Moved (University of Georgia Press, 2002) is a rigorously researched account of the tumultuous events surrounding UGA’s desegregation by UGA history professor Robert Pratt. Relying on archival materials and oral histories, he debunks myths about the landmark decision to admit black students to the university.

Equal Justice Under the Law

Equal Justice Under the Law (Farrar Straus Giroux, 1998) is the memoir of Constance Baker Motley, a key member of the legal team for both Horace Ward's admissions lawsuit and also that of Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter. Motley, who went on to become a federal judge, worked for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund at the time.

Ernest Vandiver, Governor of Georgia

Ernest Vandiver, Governor of Georgia (University of Georgia Press, 2000) is a biography of the man who presided over the state from 1958 until 1962, when Georgia grappled with the issue of desegregation of its public schools. Written by Harold Paulk Henderson, a professor of political science at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, the book presents a detailed portrait of this transitional figure in the political history of the state.

The University of Georgia: A Bicentennial History 1785-1985

The University of Georgia: A Bicentennial History 1785-1985 (University of Georgia Press, 1985) is a richly varied account of people and events by Thomas Dyer, a professor of history who served the university in many roles, including vice president for instruction. The book includes a 32-page chapter on the desegregation of the institution.

Sitting In and Speaking Out: Student Movements in the American South, 1960–1970

Sitting In and Speaking Out: Student Movements in the American South, 1960–1970 (University of Georgia Press, 2010) by Jeffrey A. Turner examines student movements in the South, including sections on the desegregation of UGA, to grasp the nature of activism in the region during the turbulent 1960s.